Last edited by Mazulmaran
Sunday, October 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of Head and neck injuries in sports found in the catalog.

Head and neck injuries in sports

Stephen E. Reid

Head and neck injuries in sports

by Stephen E. Reid

  • 58 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by C.C. Thomas in Springfield, Ill., U.S.A .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Head -- Wounds and injuries.,
  • Neck -- Wounds and injuries.,
  • First aid in illness and injury.,
  • Sports injuries.,
  • Athletic injuries -- Therapy.,
  • Head injuries -- Therapy.,
  • Neck -- Injuries.,
  • First aid.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographies and index.

    Statementby Stephen E. Reid and Stephen E. Reid, Jr., with contributions by Stephen E. Long and Gil Raviv.
    ContributionsReid, Stephen E.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRD521 .R454 1984
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 200 p. :
    Number of Pages200
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3181633M
    ISBN 100398049742
    LC Control Number83024294

      Head and neck injuries combine for percent of sports injuries. Deaths from sports injuries are rare. When they do happen, they’re most likely the result of head injury. Head Injuries In Football Words | 7 Pages Many people that play sports get into some type of injury, the majority of injuries sustained in sports are usually head related. Football has about , injuries, basketball with , injuries, and rugby with 1, injuries between the years of and has continued to skyrocket.

    The Riskiest Sports for Head Injuries Here's how each sport stacks up in the head-injury risk category. Another issue: A child's neck isn't as strong as an adult's, so a blow to the head from. Management of Head and Neck Injuries by the Sideline Physician JOHN W. WHITESIDE, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona A lthough catastrophic injuries are rare in sports, they are the main.

    Books shelved as brain-injury: Left Neglected by Lisa Genova, My Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey by Jill Bolte Taylor, Head Cases. Various Sports can contribute to neck injuries of varying degrees of severity, including neck fractures and cervical spinal cord injuries (SCIs). A fractured (broken) neck is a very serious matter, but in many cases, the patient can make a full recovery and regain all neurological function. Sports vs. Neck Injury Biking.


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Head and neck injuries in sports by Stephen E. Reid Download PDF EPUB FB2

Head and neck injuries such as concussions and stingers aren't unique to full-contact sport athletes such as football and hockey players. While age, position, and style of play can all affect a person's head injury risk, any athlete can sustain a head or neck injury during the course of articles below will help you learn to recognize head and neck injury symptoms and risks.

Genre/Form: Congress Congrès: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Head and neck injuries in sports. Philadelphia, PA: ASTM, © (OCoLC) Genre/Form: Nackenverletzung: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Reid, Stephen E.

(Stephen Emmett), Head and neck injuries in sports. “This book provides up-to-date information about head and neck injuries in young athletes ranging from relatively minor problems to life-threatening issues. The book is written for team physicians, sports medicine physicians, and orthopedists.

- blow to the head - impact site injury (coup injury) - opposite side of skull Head and neck injuries in sports book (contra coup injury) - indirect injury to the head from damaging forces traveling from other parts of the body (jaw, nose, and tailbone) - treat every head injury as if there is a neck injury as well and vice versa.

According to cheerleading data from the CPSC, head and neck injuries accounted for percent of total cheerleading injuries.

Additionally, in the school year head injuries were associated with concussions, contusions and 2, internal injuries; neck injuries accounted for contusions, 16 fractures and 1, Playing sports regularly can put a lot of wear and tear on the muscles and ligaments of your neck.

Direct blows to your head or shoulder can lead to head injuries, as well as disc and nerve damage. Head and Neck Injuries in Sports.

Earl F. Hoerner. Preview this book condyle contusion damage effects energy equipment factors fatal flexion football force fractures frequency G peak Gx impact vector head and neck head impact head injuries helpseeking hematomas hemorrhages Hoerner Hybrid III ice hockey impact attenuation impact vector 5/5(1).

Head injuries have been shown to account for between 4 and 22% of soccer injuries. Clinical and neuropsychological investigations of patients with minor head trauma have revealed organic brain damage.

69 active football (soccer) players and 37 former players of the Norwegian national team were included in a neurological and electroencephalographic (EEG) study to investigate the incidence Cited by: Head and Neck Injuries in Sports by Stephen E.

Reid (Author) › Visit Amazon's Stephen E. Reid Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author.

Are you an author. Learn about Author Central. Stephen E. Reid (Author) ISBN ISBN Cited by: 3. “This book provides up-to-date information about head and neck injuries in young athletes ranging from relatively minor problems to life-threatening issues.

The book is written for team physicians, sports medicine physicians, and : Hardcover. Head to head contact between athletes is the most common mechanism for concussion, while heading does not appear to be a frequent cause. Research is providing evidence that neck muscle development and protective headgear may play a role in the prevention of by: Head and neck injuries are all too common in sports like football, soccer, lacrosse, and many other common high school sports.

Head, spine, or brain injury indicators are often headaches, nausea, dizziness, vomiting, and confusion. Rest is the key to concussion recovery. It is difficult to estimate how long it will take a patient to recover because there is no clear-cut way to determine the severity of the concussion.

Below are guidelines for concussion recovery. Once the concussion symptoms go away, a patient may slowly and carefully resume normal daily activities. Providing the most current information on injuries to the head and neck sustained by young athletes, this practical text presents a thorough review of the complex and emerging issues for youths and adolescents involved in contact/collision sports.

Football-related head injuries, in particular concussions, are more common than neck fractures, but it is not infrequent for a player to incur both a head and neck injury during an incident.

Of the estimated 2, sports-related neck fractures treated at U.S. hospital emergency rooms in. Head and neck injuries are some of the scariest injuries to witness or have.

Our head and neck are crucial to our well-being and functionality. When one of these important body parts is injured, there is usually a lot of merited concern. Here are four common head and neck injuries that are common in sports. Concussions. Athletic Injuries of the Head and Neck Book,pp.

This. second. edition. Sports injuries affecting the lower extremities in high impact sports, such as athletics or basketball. Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death.

Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are Cited by: In book: The U.S. Soccer Sports Medicine Book, Chapter: Acute Head and Neck Injuries, Publisher: Williams and Wilkins, Editors: WE Garrett, DT Kirkendall, SR Contiguglia, pp Cite this.

Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the by:   Common Head and Neck Injuries in Extreme Sports () There was a wide range of injury rates for HNI between individual extreme sports (Figure 2).

The 4 sports with the highest total number of reported HNIs during the year period were skateboarding (,), snowboarding (97,), skiing (83,), and motocross (78,) (Table 1).Cited by: Head Injuries. There are many types of head injuries.

These injuries can occur alone or in combination: Scalp injuries. The most frequent injuries to the scalp are abrasions, scrapes and lacerations.

There are many blood vessels in the scalp, so even minor cuts bleed a .